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Babies boppin away to music

November 26, 2015

Listening to music could be just as beneficial as reading to young children, according to research being undertaken at the University of Queensland and being implemented in programs run at North Lakes.

The Study, led by UQ School of Music Professor Margaret Barrett, asked parents of children aged two to three to report on shared music activities.

Social, emotional and cognitive outcomes were measured two years later when the child was three to four, and showed that playing with toddlers could benefit their development even more than shared reading.

“Children who experienced more frequent parent-child music activity at two to three years showed stronger vocabulary and numeracy skills, more pro-social skills and stronger abilities to regulate their own attention at four to five years old,” Prof Barrett said.

“The study highlights that informal music education in early childhood is a vital tool for supporting the cognitive and social development of children.”

Vicky Abad one of the participants involved in UQ’s Being and Becoming Musical study, also founded the Boppin’ Babies program which introduces young children to music.

“I believe shared music helps parents and children grow together in healthy, happy ways, while helping children developmentally in the short and long term,” she said.

Boppin’ Babies music groups are held at the Queensland Music Centre, 8 Oxley St, North Lakes on Thursdays from 9-10am.

North Lakes mum Alicia Lane has seen the benefits already in her daughter Chloe, 1, who is a regular at the sessions.

“You can see it when she watches TV. When there is music on she is up and dancing,” Mrs Lane said.

Originally published in North Lakes Times

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